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April 22, 2019

How PR is Like a Cross-country Road Trip

Written by Jordan Garegnani, MPR Project Manager and Digital Community Manager

Like I said, I write what I know and right now I’m on a week-long cross-country road trip (mobile hotspots are MAGIC!) and I can’t help but learn a few life lessons that are highly useful in marketing and PR. I can’t express how amazing it is to have an office that lets me get away with working remotely as I traverse across the country and then lets me write about it 🙂

Flexibility

You plan and plan – the best route, but the best tag line, event layout, rest stops or hotels. And sometimes it goes off without a hitch, but more likely than not, something will always go wrong. Your water pump breaks, a vendor doesn’t show up, you get stuck in Colby, Kansas on a night that you were supposed to be in Denver or a Facebook ad isn’t performing the way you’d like. If you’re not a naturally flexible person, you might want to go on a road trip to practice bending with whatever is thrown at you 🙂

Having reasonable expectations will help you be flexible as well – like not getting mad when your friend may or may not get her phone out fast enough to navigate and you miss going to Superman’s birthplace (cough, me, cough). But it’ll also help when only a few tenants participate in a promotion rather than the whole lot.

I always like to say, “Plan for the worst, hope for the best.” If you have a plan A, B and C when something goes wrong, the going wrong feels a little less terrible.

Prioritizing Goals

When things do go wrong, it’s usually not just one thing. For example, your AC might go out and when they’re investigating it, find your water pump also needs to be replaced or else you’ll end up stuck on the side of the road. Then once the pump is fixed, you might still have a rattle in your engine. You can’t necessarily fix everything at once.

So tally up all your options and strategize what’s the highest priority, keeping a deadline, pleasing the client, staying on budget, etc. From there you can take care of immediate needs and follow up with the lower-priority goals.

Ask for Help

We all like to think we can do things on our own as competent adults, but sometimes you have to give up the wheel or ask someone on your team to cover for you when you can’t be in the office. Chances are they really won’t mind as long as you give them a big thanks.

Roughing It

Not everything can be perfect and your best effort instead of your best work sometimes has to do in a clutch. And sometimes fast food will have to suffice for a meal instead of sitting down for dinner.

No Looking Back

Second-guessing your already-made decisions only causes more stress and anxiety. You’ve thoughtfully sorted through your choices and made the best decision with the information you had. What’s done is done and you can only drive forward so there’s no point in saying “we should have…”

Bonus: Are We There Yet?
No.  You’re never “there.” There’s always ways to be better, grow and expand, so stop asking if we’re there yet. A life, work, road trip lesson all in one.

About Marion Myers

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